Docs: Type Reference


Type Reference

Type Reference

This page is autogenerated; any changes will get overwritten (last generated on Sat May 21 17:20:18 -0700 2011)

Resource Types

  • The namevar is the parameter used to uniquely identify a type instance. This is the parameter that gets assigned when a string is provided before the colon in a type declaration. In general, only developers will need to worry about which parameter is the namevar.

    In the following code:

    file { "/etc/passwd":
      owner => root,
      group => root,
      mode => 644
    }
    

    /etc/passwd is considered the title of the file object (used for things like dependency handling), and because path is the namevar for file, that string is assigned to the path parameter.

  • Parameters determine the specific configuration of the instance. They either directly modify the system (internally, these are called properties) or they affect how the instance behaves (e.g., adding a search path for exec instances or determining recursion on file instances).

  • Providers provide low-level functionality for a given resource type. This is usually in the form of calling out to external commands.

    When required binaries are specified for providers, fully qualifed paths indicate that the binary must exist at that specific path and unqualified binaries indicate that Puppet will search for the binary using the shell path.

  • Features are abilities that some providers might not support. You can use the list of supported features to determine how a given provider can be used.

    Resource types define features they can use, and providers can be tested to see which features they provide.


augeas

Apply the changes (single or array of changes) to the filesystem via the augeas tool.

Requires:

  • augeas to be installed (http://www.augeas.net)
  • ruby-augeas bindings

Sample usage with a string:

augeas{"test1" :
  context => "/files/etc/sysconfig/firstboot",
  changes => "set RUN_FIRSTBOOT YES",
  onlyif  => "match other_value size > 0",
}

Sample usage with an array and custom lenses:

augeas{"jboss_conf":
  context => "/files",
  changes => [
    "set /etc/jbossas/jbossas.conf/JBOSS_IP $ipaddress",
    "set /etc/jbossas/jbossas.conf/JAVA_HOME /usr"
  ],
  load_path => "$/usr/share/jbossas/lenses",
}

Features

  • execute_changes: Actually make the changes
  • need_to_run?: If the command should run
  • parse_commands: Parse the command string
Provider execute_changes need_to_run? parse_commands
augeas X X X

Parameters

changes
The changes which should be applied to the filesystem. This can be either a string which contains a command or an array of commands. Commands supported are:
  set [PATH] [VALUE]            Sets the value VALUE at loction PATH
  rm [PATH]                     Removes the node at location PATH
  remove [PATH]                 Synonym for rm
  clear [PATH]                  Keeps the node at PATH, but removes the value.
  ins [LABEL] [WHERE] [PATH]    Inserts an empty node LABEL either [WHERE={before|after}] PATH.
  insert [LABEL] [WHERE] [PATH] Synonym for ins

If the parameter ‘context’ is set that value is prepended to PATH

context
Optional context path. This value is prepended to the paths of all changes if the path is relative. If INCL is set, defaults to ‘/files’ + INCL, otherwise the empty string
force
Optional command to force the augeas type to execute even if it thinks changes will not be made. This does not overide the only setting. If onlyif is set, then the foce setting will not override that result
incl
Load only a specific file, e.g. /etc/hosts. When this parameter is set, you must also set the lens parameter to indicate which lens to use.
lens
Use a specific lens, e.g. Hosts.lns. When this parameter is set, you must also set the incl parameter to indicate which file to load. Only that file will be loaded, which greatly speeds up execution of the type
load_path
Optional colon separated list of directories; these directories are searched for schema definitions
name
The name of this task. Used for uniqueness
onlyif
Optional augeas command and comparisons to control the execution of this type. Supported onlyif syntax:
  get [AUGEAS_PATH] [COMPARATOR] [STRING]
  match [MATCH_PATH] size [COMPARATOR] [INT]
  match [MATCH_PATH] include [STRING]
  match [MATCH_PATH] not_include [STRING]
  match [MATCH_PATH] == [AN_ARRAY]
  match [MATCH_PATH] != [AN_ARRAY]

where:

  AUGEAS_PATH is a valid path scoped by the context
  MATCH_PATH is a valid match synatx scoped by the context
  COMPARATOR is in the set [> >= != == <= <]
  STRING is a string
  INT is a number
  AN_ARRAY is in the form ['a string', 'another']
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • augeas: Supported features: execute_changes, need_to_run?, parse_commands.
returns
The expected return code from the augeas command. Should not be set
root
A file system path; all files loaded by Augeas are loaded underneath ROOT
type_check
Set to true if augeas should perform typechecking. Optional, defaults to false Valid values are true, false.

computer

Computer object management using DirectoryService on OS X.

Note that these are distinctly different kinds of objects to ‘hosts’, as they require a MAC address and can have all sorts of policy attached to them.

This provider only manages Computer objects in the local directory service domain, not in remote directories.

If you wish to manage /etc/hosts file on Mac OS X, then simply use the host type as per other platforms.

This type primarily exists to create localhost Computer objects that MCX policy can then be attached to.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the plist file representing a Computer object (located at /var/db/dslocal/nodes/Default/computers/{name}.plist), the Computer resource will autorequire it.

Parameters

en_address
The MAC address of the primary network interface. Must match en0.
ensure
Control the existences of this computer record. Set this attribute to present to ensure the computer record exists. Set it to absent to delete any computer records with this name Valid values are present, absent.
ip_address
The IP Address of the Computer object.
name
The authoritative ‘short’ name of the computer record.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • directoryservice: Computer object management using DirectoryService on OS X. Note that these are distinctly different kinds of objects to ‘hosts’, as they require a MAC address and can have all sorts of policy attached to them.

    This provider only manages Computer objects in the local directory service domain, not in remote directories.

    If you wish to manage /etc/hosts on Mac OS X, then simply use the host type as per other platforms. Default for operatingsystem == darwin.

realname
The ‘long’ name of the computer record.

cron

Installs and manages cron jobs. All fields except the command and the user are optional, although specifying no periodic fields would result in the command being executed every minute. While the name of the cron job is not part of the actual job, it is used by Puppet to store and retrieve it.

If you specify a cron job that matches an existing job in every way except name, then the jobs will be considered equivalent and the new name will be permanently associated with that job. Once this association is made and synced to disk, you can then manage the job normally (e.g., change the schedule of the job).

Example:

cron { logrotate:
  command => "/usr/sbin/logrotate",
  user => root,
  hour => 2,
  minute => 0
}

Note that all cron values can be specified as an array of values:

cron { logrotate:
  command => "/usr/sbin/logrotate",
  user => root,
  hour => [2, 4]
}

Or using ranges, or the step syntax */2 (although there’s no guarantee that your cron daemon supports it):

cron { logrotate:
  command => "/usr/sbin/logrotate",
  user => root,
  hour => ['2-4'],
  minute => '*/10'
}

Parameters

command
The command to execute in the cron job. The environment provided to the command varies by local system rules, and it is best to always provide a fully qualified command. The user’s profile is not sourced when the command is run, so if the user’s environment is desired it should be sourced manually.

All cron parameters support absent as a value; this will remove any existing values for that field.

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
environment
Any environment settings associated with this cron job. They will be stored between the header and the job in the crontab. There can be no guarantees that other, earlier settings will not also affect a given cron job.

Also, Puppet cannot automatically determine whether an existing, unmanaged environment setting is associated with a given cron job. If you already have cron jobs with environment settings, then Puppet will keep those settings in the same place in the file, but will not associate them with a specific job.

Settings should be specified exactly as they should appear in the crontab, e.g., PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin.

hour
The hour at which to run the cron job. Optional; if specified, must be between 0 and 23, inclusive.
minute
The minute at which to run the cron job. Optional; if specified, must be between 0 and 59, inclusive.
month
The month of the year. Optional; if specified must be between 1 and 12 or the month name (e.g., December).
monthday
The day of the month on which to run the command. Optional; if specified, must be between 1 and 31.
name
The symbolic name of the cron job. This name is used for human reference only and is generated automatically for cron jobs found on the system. This generally won’t matter, as Puppet will do its best to match existing cron jobs against specified jobs (and Puppet adds a comment to cron jobs it adds), but it is at least possible that converting from unmanaged jobs to managed jobs might require manual intervention.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • crontab: Required binaries: crontab.
special
A special value such as ‘reboot’ or ‘annually’. Only available on supported systems such as Vixie Cron. Overrides more specific time of day/week settings.
target
Where the cron job should be stored. For crontab-style entries this is the same as the user and defaults that way. Other providers default accordingly.
user
The user to run the command as. This user must be allowed to run cron jobs, which is not currently checked by Puppet.

The user defaults to whomever Puppet is running as.

weekday
The weekday on which to run the command. Optional; if specified, must be between 0 and 7, inclusive, with 0 (or 7) being Sunday, or must be the name of the day (e.g., Tuesday).

exec

Executes external commands. It is critical that all commands executed using this mechanism can be run multiple times without harm, i.e., they are idempotent. One useful way to create idempotent commands is to use the checks like creates to avoid running the command unless some condition is met.

Note that you can restrict an exec to only run when it receives events by using the refreshonly parameter; this is a useful way to have your configuration respond to events with arbitrary commands.

Note also that if an exec receives an event from another resource, it will get executed again (or execute the command specified in refresh, if there is one).

There is a strong tendency to use exec to do whatever work Puppet can’t already do; while this is obviously acceptable (and unavoidable) in the short term, it is highly recommended to migrate work from exec to native Puppet types as quickly as possible. If you find that you are doing a lot of work with exec, please at least notify us at Puppet Labs what you are doing, and hopefully we can work with you to get a native resource type for the work you are doing.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing an exec’s cwd or the executable file used in an exec’s command, the exec resource will autorequire those files. If Puppet is managing the user that an exec should run as, the exec resource will autorequire that user.

Parameters

command
  • namevar

    The actual command to execute. Must either be fully qualified or a search path for the command must be provided. If the command succeeds, any output produced will be logged at the instance’s normal log level (usually notice), but if the command fails (meaning its return code does not match the specified code) then any output is logged at the err log level.

creates
A file that this command creates. If this parameter is provided, then the command will only be run if the specified file does not exist:
  exec { "tar xf /my/tar/file.tar":
    cwd => "/var/tmp",
    creates => "/var/tmp/myfile",
    path => ["/usr/bin", "/usr/sbin"]
  }
cwd
The directory from which to run the command. If this directory does not exist, the command will fail.
environment
Any additional environment variables you want to set for a command. Note that if you use this to set PATH, it will override the path attribute. Multiple environment variables should be specified as an array.
group
The group to run the command as. This seems to work quite haphazardly on different platforms – it is a platform issue not a Ruby or Puppet one, since the same variety exists when running commands as different users in the shell.
logoutput
Whether to log output. Defaults to logging output at the loglevel for the exec resource. Use on_failure to only log the output when the command reports an error. Valid values are true, false, on_failure.
onlyif
If this parameter is set, then this exec will only run if the command returns 0. For example:
  exec { "logrotate":
    path => "/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/bin",
    onlyif => "test `du /var/log/messages | cut -f1` -gt 100000"
  }

This would run logrotate only if that test returned true.

Note that this command follows the same rules as the main command, which is to say that it must be fully qualified if the path is not set.

Also note that onlyif can take an array as its value, e.g.:

  onlyif => ["test -f /tmp/file1", "test -f /tmp/file2"]

This will only run the exec if /all/ conditions in the array return true.

path
The search path used for command execution. Commands must be fully qualified if no path is specified. Paths can be specified as an array or as a colon separated list.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • posix: Execute external binaries directly, on POSIX systems. This does not pass through a shell, or perform any interpolation, but only directly calls the command with the arguments given. Default for feature == posix.
  • shell: Execute external binaries directly, on POSIX systems. passing through a shell so that shell built ins are available.
refresh
How to refresh this command. By default, the exec is just called again when it receives an event from another resource, but this parameter allows you to define a different command for refreshing.
refreshonly
The command should only be run as a refresh mechanism for when a dependent object is changed. It only makes sense to use this option when this command depends on some other object; it is useful for triggering an action:
  # Pull down the main aliases file
  file { "/etc/aliases":
    source => "puppet://server/module/aliases"
  }

  # Rebuild the database, but only when the file changes
  exec { newaliases:
    path => ["/usr/bin", "/usr/sbin"],
    subscribe => File["/etc/aliases"],
    refreshonly => true
  }

Note that only subscribe and notify can trigger actions, not require, so it only makes sense to use refreshonly with subscribe or notify. Valid values are true, false.

returns
The expected return code(s). An error will be returned if the executed command returns something else. Defaults to 0. Can be specified as an array of acceptable return codes or a single value.
timeout
The maximum time the command should take. If the command takes longer than the timeout, the command is considered to have failed and will be stopped. Use 0 to disable the timeout. The time is specified in seconds.
tries
The number of times execution of the command should be tried. Defaults to ‘1’. This many attempts will be made to execute the command until an acceptable return code is returned. Note that the timeout paramater applies to each try rather than to the complete set of tries.
try_sleep
The time to sleep in seconds between ‘tries’.
unless
If this parameter is set, then this exec will run unless the command returns 0. For example:
  exec { "/bin/echo root >> /usr/lib/cron/cron.allow":
    path => "/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/bin",
    unless => "grep root /usr/lib/cron/cron.allow 2>/dev/null"
  }

This would add root to the cron.allow file (on Solaris) unless grep determines it’s already there.

Note that this command follows the same rules as the main command, which is to say that it must be fully qualified if the path is not set.

user
The user to run the command as. Note that if you use this then any error output is not currently captured. This is because of a bug within Ruby. If you are using Puppet to create this user, the exec will automatically require the user, as long as it is specified by name.

Please also note that $HOME is not set when using this option.


file

Manages local files, including setting ownership and permissions, creation of both files and directories, and retrieving entire files from remote servers. As Puppet matures, it expected that the file resource will be used less and less to manage content, and instead native resources will be used to do so.

If you find that you are often copying files in from a central location, rather than using native resources, please contact Puppet Labs and we can hopefully work with you to develop a native resource to support what you are doing.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the user or group that owns a file, the file resource will autorequire them. If Puppet is managing any parent directories of a file, the file resource will autorequire them.

Parameters

backup
Whether files should be backed up before being replaced. The preferred method of backing files up is via a filebucket, which stores files by their MD5 sums and allows easy retrieval without littering directories with backups. You can specify a local filebucket or a network-accessible server-based filebucket by setting backup => bucket-name. Alternatively, if you specify any value that begins with a . (e.g., .puppet-bak), then Puppet will use copy the file in the same directory with that value as the extension of the backup. Setting backup => false disables all backups of the file in question.

Puppet automatically creates a local filebucket named puppet and defaults to backing up there. To use a server-based filebucket, you must specify one in your configuration

    filebucket { main:
      server => puppet
    }

The puppet master daemon creates a filebucket by default, so you can usually back up to your main server with this configuration. Once you’ve described the bucket in your configuration, you can use it in any file

    file { "/my/file":
      source => "/path/in/nfs/or/something",
      backup => main
    }

This will back the file up to the central server.

At this point, the benefits of using a filebucket are that you do not have backup files lying around on each of your machines, a given version of a file is only backed up once, and you can restore any given file manually, no matter how old. Eventually, transactional support will be able to automatically restore filebucketed files.

checksum
The checksum type to use when checksumming a file.

The default checksum parameter, if checksums are enabled, is md5. Valid values are md5, md5lite, mtime, ctime, none.

content
Specify the contents of a file as a string. Newlines, tabs, and spaces can be specified using the escaped syntax (e.g., \n for a newline). The primary purpose of this parameter is to provide a kind of limited templating:
  define resolve(nameserver1, nameserver2, domain, search) {
      $str = "search $search
          domain $domain
          nameserver $nameserver1
          nameserver $nameserver2
          "

      file { "/etc/resolv.conf":
        content => $str
      }
  }

This attribute is especially useful when used with templating.

ctime
A read-only state to check the file ctime.
ensure
Whether to create files that don’t currently exist. Possible values are absent, present, file, and directory. Specifying present will match any form of file existence, and if the file is missing will create an empty file. Specifying absent will delete the file (and directory if recurse => true).

Anything other than those values will create a symlink. In the interest of readability and clarity, you should use ensure => link and explicitly specify a target; however, if a target attribute isn’t provided, the value of the ensure attribute will be used as the symlink target:

  # (Useful on Solaris)
  # Less maintainable: 
  file { "/etc/inetd.conf":
    ensure => "/etc/inet/inetd.conf",
  }

  # More maintainable:
  file { "/etc/inetd.conf":
    ensure => link,
    target => "/etc/inet/inetd.conf",
  }

These two declarations are equivalent. Valid values are absent (also called false), file, present, directory, link. Values can match /./.

force
Force the file operation. Currently only used when replacing directories with links. Valid values are true, false.
group
Which group should own the file. Argument can be either group name or group ID.
ignore
A parameter which omits action on files matching specified patterns during recursion. Uses Ruby’s builtin globbing engine, so shell metacharacters are fully supported, e.g. [a-z]*. Matches that would descend into the directory structure are ignored, e.g., */*.
links
How to handle links during file actions. During file copying, follow will copy the target file instead of the link, manage will copy the link itself, and ignore will just pass it by. When not copying, manage and ignore behave equivalently (because you cannot really ignore links entirely during local recursion), and follow will manage the file to which the link points. Valid values are follow, manage.
mode
Mode the file should be. Currently relatively limited: you must specify the exact mode the file should be.

Note that when you set the mode of a directory, Puppet always sets the search/traverse (1) bit anywhere the read (4) bit is set. This is almost always what you want: read allows you to list the entries in a directory, and search/traverse allows you to access (read/write/execute) those entries.) Because of this feature, you can recursively make a directory and all of the files in it world-readable by setting e.g.:

  file { '/some/dir':
    mode => 644,
    recurse => true,
  }

In this case all of the files underneath /some/dir will have mode 644, and all of the directories will have mode 755.

mtime
A read-only state to check the file mtime.
owner
To whom the file should belong. Argument can be user name or user ID.
path
  • namevar

    The path to the file to manage. Must be fully qualified.

provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • microsoft_windows: Uses Microsoft Windows functionality to manage file’s users and rights.
  • posix: Uses POSIX functionality to manage file’s users and rights.
purge
Whether unmanaged files should be purged. If you have a filebucket configured the purged files will be uploaded, but if you do not, this will destroy data. Only use this option for generated files unless you really know what you are doing. This option only makes sense when recursively managing directories.

Note that when using purge with source, Puppet will purge any files that are not on the remote system. Valid values are true, false.

recurse
Whether and how deeply to do recursive management. Options are:
  • inf,true — Regular style recursion on both remote and local directory structure.
  • remote — Descends recursively into the remote directory but not the local directory. Allows copying of a few files into a directory containing many unmanaged files without scanning all the local files.
  • false — Default of no recursion.
  • [0-9]+ — Same as true, but limit recursion. Warning: this syntax has been deprecated in favor of the recurselimit attribute. Valid values are true, false, inf, remote. Values can match /^[0-9]+$/.
recurselimit
How deeply to do recursive management. Values can match /^[0-9]+$/.
replace
Whether or not to replace a file that is sourced but exists. This is useful for using file sources purely for initialization. Valid values are true (also called yes), false (also called no).
selinux_ignore_defaults
If this is set then Puppet will not ask SELinux (via matchpathcon) to supply defaults for the SELinux attributes (seluser, selrole, seltype, and selrange). In general, you should leave this set at its default and only set it to true when you need Puppet to not try to fix SELinux labels automatically. Valid values are true, false.
selrange
What the SELinux range component of the context of the file should be. Any valid SELinux range component is accepted. For example s0 or SystemHigh. If not specified it defaults to the value returned by matchpathcon for the file, if any exists. Only valid on systems with SELinux support enabled and that have support for MCS (Multi-Category Security).
selrole
What the SELinux role component of the context of the file should be. Any valid SELinux role component is accepted. For example role_r. If not specified it defaults to the value returned by matchpathcon for the file, if any exists. Only valid on systems with SELinux support enabled.
seltype
What the SELinux type component of the context of the file should be. Any valid SELinux type component is accepted. For example tmp_t. If not specified it defaults to the value returned by matchpathcon for the file, if any exists. Only valid on systems with SELinux support enabled.
seluser
What the SELinux user component of the context of the file should be. Any valid SELinux user component is accepted. For example user_u. If not specified it defaults to the value returned by matchpathcon for the file, if any exists. Only valid on systems with SELinux support enabled.
source
Copy a file over the current file. Uses checksum to determine when a file should be copied. Valid values are either fully qualified paths to files, or URIs. Currently supported URI types are puppet and file.

This is one of the primary mechanisms for getting content into applications that Puppet does not directly support and is very useful for those configuration files that don’t change much across sytems. For instance:

  class sendmail {
    file { "/etc/mail/sendmail.cf":
      source => "puppet://server/modules/module_name/sendmail.cf"
    }
  }

You can also leave out the server name, in which case puppet agent will fill in the name of its configuration server and puppet apply will use the local filesystem. This makes it easy to use the same configuration in both local and centralized forms.

Currently, only the puppet scheme is supported for source URL’s. Puppet will connect to the file server running on server to retrieve the contents of the file. If the server part is empty, the behavior of the command-line interpreter (puppet apply) and the client demon (puppet agent) differs slightly: apply will look such a file up on the module path on the local host, whereas agent will connect to the puppet server that it received the manifest from.

See the fileserver configuration documentation for information on how to configure and use file services within Puppet.

If you specify multiple file sources for a file, then the first source that exists will be used. This allows you to specify what amount to search paths for files:

  file { "/path/to/my/file":
    source => [
      "/modules/nfs/files/file.$host",
      "/modules/nfs/files/file.$operatingsystem",
      "/modules/nfs/files/file"
    ]
  }

This will use the first found file as the source.

You cannot currently copy links using this mechanism; set links to follow if any remote sources are links.

sourceselect
Whether to copy all valid sources, or just the first one. This parameter is only used in recursive copies; by default, the first valid source is the only one used as a recursive source, but if this parameter is set to all, then all valid sources will have all of their contents copied to the local host, and for sources that have the same file, the source earlier in the list will be used. Valid values are first, all.
target
The target for creating a link. Currently, symlinks are the only type supported.

You can make relative links:

  # (Useful on Solaris)
  file { "/etc/inetd.conf":
    ensure => link,
    target => "inet/inetd.conf",
  }

You can also make recursive symlinks, which will create a directory structure that maps to the target directory, with directories corresponding to each directory and links corresponding to each file. Valid values are notlink. Values can match /./.

type
A read-only state to check the file type.

filebucket

A repository for backing up files. If no filebucket is defined, then files will be backed up in their current directory, but the filebucket can be either a host- or site-global repository for backing up. It stores files and returns the MD5 sum, which can later be used to retrieve the file if restoration becomes necessary. A filebucket does not do any work itself; instead, it can be specified as the value of backup in a file object.

Currently, filebuckets are only useful for manual retrieval of accidentally removed files (e.g., you look in the log for the md5 sum and retrieve the file with that sum from the filebucket), but when transactions are fully supported filebuckets will be used to undo transactions.

You will normally want to define a single filebucket for your whole network and then use that as the default backup location:

# Define the bucket
filebucket { main: server => puppet }

# Specify it as the default target
File { backup => main }

Puppetmaster servers create a filebucket by default, so this will work in a default configuration.

Parameters

name
The name of the filebucket.
path
The path to the local filebucket. If this is unset, then the bucket is remote. The parameter server must can be specified to set the remote server.
port
The port on which the remote server is listening. Defaults to the normal Puppet port, 8140.
server
The server providing the remote filebucket. If this is not specified then path is checked. If it is set, then the bucket is local. Otherwise the puppetmaster server specified in the config or at the commandline is used.

group

Manage groups. On most platforms this can only create groups. Group membership must be managed on individual users.

On some platforms such as OS X, group membership is managed as an attribute of the group, not the user record. Providers must have the feature ‘manages_members’ to manage the ‘members’ property of a group record.

Features

  • manages_aix_lam: The provider can manage AIX Loadable Authentication Module (LAM) system.
  • manages_members: For directories where membership is an attribute of groups not users.
  • system_groups: The provider allows you to create system groups with lower GIDs.
Provider manages_aix_lam manages_members system_groups
aix X X  
directoryservice   X  
groupadd     X
ldap      
pw      

Parameters

allowdupe
Whether to allow duplicate GIDs. This option does not work on FreeBSD (contract to the pw man page). Valid values are true, false.
attribute_membership
Whether specified attribute value pairs should be treated as the only attributes of the user or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
attributes
Specify group AIX attributes in an array of keyvalue pairs Requires features manages_aix_lam.
auth_membership
whether the provider is authoritative for group membership.
ensure
Create or remove the group. Valid values are present, absent.
gid
The group ID. Must be specified numerically. If not specified, a number will be picked, which can result in ID differences across systems and thus is not recommended. The GID is picked according to local system standards.
ia_load_module
The name of the I&A module to use to manage this user Requires features manages_aix_lam.
members
The members of the group. For directory services where group membership is stored in the group objects, not the users. Requires features manages_members.
name
The group name. While naming limitations vary by system, it is advisable to keep the name to the degenerate limitations, which is a maximum of 8 characters beginning with a letter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • aix: Group management for AIX! Users are managed with mkgroup, rmgroup, lsgroup, chgroup Required binaries: /usr/sbin/lsgroup, /usr/sbin/rmgroup, /usr/bin/chgroup, /usr/bin/mkgroup. Default for operatingsystem == aix. Supported features: manages_aix_lam, manages_members.
  • directoryservice: Group management using DirectoryService on OS X.

    Required binaries: /usr/bin/dscl. Default for operatingsystem == darwin. Supported features: manages_members.

  • groupadd: Group management via groupadd and its ilk.

    The default for most platforms

    Required binaries: groupdel, groupmod, groupadd. Supported features: system_groups.

  • ldap: Group management via ldap.

    This provider requires that you have valid values for all of the ldap-related settings, including ldapbase. You will also almost definitely need settings for ldapuser and ldappassword, so that your clients can write to ldap.

    Note that this provider will automatically generate a GID for you if you do not specify one, but it is a potentially expensive operation, as it iterates across all existing groups to pick the appropriate next one.

  • pw: Group management via pw.

    Only works on FreeBSD.

    Required binaries: /usr/sbin/pw. Default for operatingsystem == freebsd.

system
Whether the group is a system group with lower GID. Valid values are true, false.

host

Installs and manages host entries. For most systems, these entries will just be in /etc/hosts, but some systems (notably OS X) will have different solutions.

Parameters

comment
A comment that will be attached to the line with a # character
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
host_aliases
Any aliases the host might have. Multiple values must be specified as an array.
ip
The host’s IP address, IPv4 or IPv6.
name
The host name.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • parsed:
target
The file in which to store service information. Only used by those providers that write to disk. On most systems this defaults to /etc/hosts.

interface

This represents a router or switch interface. It is possible to manage interface mode (access or trunking, native vlan and encapsulation), switchport characteristics (speed, duplex).

Parameters

allowed_trunk_vlans
Allowed list of Vlans that this trunk can forward. Valid values are all. Values can match /./.
description
Interface description.
device_url
Url to connect to a router or switch.
duplex
Interface duplex. Valid values are auto, full, half.
encapsulation
Interface switchport encapsulation. Valid values are none, dot1q, isl.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present (also called no_shutdown), absent (also called shutdown).
etherchannel
Channel group this interface is part of. Values can match /^\d+/.
ipaddress
IP Address of this interface (it might not be possible to set an interface IP address it depends on the interface type and device type). Valid format of ip addresses are: * IPV4, like 127.0.0.1 * IPV4/prefixlength like 127.0.1.1/24 * IPV6/prefixlength like FE80::21A:2FFF:FE30:ECF0/128 * an optional suffix for IPV6 addresses from this list: eui-64, link-local It is also possible to use an array of values.
mode
Interface switchport mode. Valid values are access, trunk.
name
Interface name
native_vlan
Interface native vlan (for access mode only). Values can match /^\d+/.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • cisco: Cisco switch/router provider for interface.
speed
Interface speed. Valid values are auto. Values can match /^\d+/.

k5login

Manage the .k5login file for a user. Specify the full path to the .k5login file as the name and an array of principals as the property principals.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
mode
Manage the k5login file’s mode
path
  • namevar

    The path to the file to manage. Must be fully qualified.

principals
The principals present in the .k5login file.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • k5login: The k5login provider is the only provider for the k5login type.

macauthorization

Manage the Mac OS X authorization database. See the Apple developer site for more information.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the /etc/authorization file, each macauthorization resource will autorequire it.

Parameters

allow_root
Corresponds to ‘allow-root’ in the authorization store, renamed due to hyphens being problematic. Specifies whether a right should be allowed automatically if the requesting process is running with uid == 0. AuthorizationServices defaults this attribute to false if not specified Valid values are true, false.
auth_class
Corresponds to ‘class’ in the authorization store, renamed due to ‘class’ being a reserved word. Valid values are user, evaluate-mechanisms, allow, deny, rule.
auth_type
type - can be a ‘right’ or a ‘rule’. ‘comment’ has not yet been implemented. Valid values are right, rule.
authenticate_user
Corresponds to ‘authenticate-user’ in the authorization store, renamed due to hyphens being problematic. Valid values are true, false.
comment
The ‘comment’ attribute for authorization resources.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
group
The user must authenticate as a member of this group. This attribute can be set to any one group.
k_of_n
k-of-n describes how large a subset of rule mechanisms must succeed for successful authentication. If there are ‘n’ mechanisms, then ‘k’ (the integer value of this parameter) mechanisms must succeed. The most common setting for this parameter is ‘1’. If k-of-n is not set, then ‘n-of-n’ mechanisms must succeed.
mechanisms
an array of suitable mechanisms.
name
The name of the right or rule to be managed. Corresponds to ‘key’ in Authorization Services. The key is the name of a rule. A key uses the same naming conventions as a right. The Security Server uses a rule’s key to match the rule with a right. Wildcard keys end with a ‘.’. The generic rule has an empty key value. Any rights that do not match a specific rule use the generic rule.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • macauthorization: Manage Mac OS X authorization database rules and rights.

    Required binaries: /usr/bin/security, /usr/bin/sw_vers. Default for operatingsystem == darwin.

rule
The rule(s) that this right refers to.
session_owner
Corresponds to ‘session-owner’ in the authorization store, renamed due to hyphens being problematic. Whether the session owner automatically matches this rule or right. Valid values are true, false.
shared
If this is set to true, then the Security Server marks the credentials used to gain this right as shared. The Security Server may use any shared credentials to authorize this right. For maximum security, set sharing to false so credentials stored by the Security Server for one application may not be used by another application. Valid values are true, false.
timeout
The credential used by this rule expires in the specified number of seconds. For maximum security where the user must authenticate every time, set the timeout to 0. For minimum security, remove the timeout attribute so the user authenticates only once per session.
tries
The number of tries allowed.

mailalias

Creates an email alias in the local alias database.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
name
The alias name.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • aliases:
recipient
Where email should be sent. Multiple values should be specified as an array.
target
The file in which to store the aliases. Only used by those providers that write to disk.

maillist

Manage email lists. This resource type currently can only create and remove lists, it cannot reconfigure them.

Parameters

admin
The email address of the administrator.
description
The description of the mailing list.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent, purged.
mailserver
The name of the host handling email for the list.
name
The name of the email list.
password
The admin password.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • mailman: Required binaries: /usr/lib/mailman/mail/mailman, /usr/lib/mailman/bin/list_lists, /usr/lib/mailman/bin/rmlist, /usr/lib/mailman/bin/newlist.
webserver
The name of the host providing web archives and the administrative interface.

mcx

MCX object management using DirectoryService on OS X.

The default provider of this type merely manages the XML plist as reported by the dscl -mcxexport command. This is similar to the content property of the file type in Puppet.

The recommended method of using this type is to use Work Group Manager to manage users and groups on the local computer, record the resulting puppet manifest using the command puppet resource mcx, then deploy it to other machines.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the user, group, or computer that these MCX settings refer to, the MCX resource will autorequire that user, group, or computer.

Features

  • manages_content: The provider can manage MCXSettings as a string.
Provider manages_content
mcxcontent X

Parameters

content
The XML Plist. The value of MCXSettings in DirectoryService. This is the standard output from the system command:
  dscl localhost -mcxexport /Local/Default/<ds_type>/ds_name

Note that ds_type is capitalized and plural in the dscl command. Requires features manages_content.

ds_name
The name to attach the MCX Setting to. e.g. ‘localhost’ when ds_type => computer. This setting is not required, as it may be parsed so long as the resource name is parseable. e.g. /Groups/admin where ‘group’ is the dstype.
ds_type
The DirectoryService type this MCX setting attaches to. Valid values are user, group, computer, computerlist.
ensure
Create or remove the MCX setting. Valid values are present, absent.
name
The name of the resource being managed. The default naming convention follows Directory Service paths:
  /Computers/localhost
  /Groups/admin
  /Users/localadmin

The ds_type and ds_name type parameters are not necessary if the default naming convention is followed.

provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • mcxcontent: MCX Settings management using DirectoryService on OS X.

    This provider manages the entire MCXSettings attribute available to some directory services nodes. This management is ‘all or nothing’ in that discrete application domain key value pairs are not managed by this provider.

    It is recommended to use WorkGroup Manager to configure Users, Groups, Computers, or ComputerLists, then use ‘ralsh mcx’ to generate a puppet manifest from the resulting configuration.

    Original Author: Jeff McCune (mccune.jeff@gmail.com)

    Required binaries: /usr/bin/dscl. Default for operatingsystem == darwin. Supported features: manages_content.


mount

Manages mounted filesystems, including putting mount information into the mount table. The actual behavior depends on the value of the ‘ensure’ parameter.

Note that if a mount receives an event from another resource, it will try to remount the filesystems if ensure is set to mounted.

Features

  • refreshable: The provider can remount the filesystem.
Provider refreshable
parsed X

Parameters

atboot
Whether to mount the mount at boot. Not all platforms support this.
blockdevice
The device to fsck. This is property is only valid on Solaris, and in most cases will default to the correct value.
device
The device providing the mount. This can be whatever device is supporting by the mount, including network devices or devices specified by UUID rather than device path, depending on the operating system.
dump
Whether to dump the mount. Not all platform support this. Valid values are 1 or 0. or 2 on FreeBSD, Default is 0. Values can match /(0|1)/, /(0|1)/.
ensure
Control what to do with this mount. Set this attribute to umounted to make sure the filesystem is in the filesystem table but not mounted (if the filesystem is currently mounted, it will be unmounted). Set it to absent to unmount (if necessary) and remove the filesystem from the fstab. Set to mounted to add it to the fstab and mount it. Set to present to add to fstab but not change mount/unmount status Valid values are defined (also called present), unmounted, absent, mounted.
fstype
The mount type. Valid values depend on the operating system. This is a required option.
name
The mount path for the mount.
options
Mount options for the mounts, as they would appear in the fstab.
pass
The pass in which the mount is checked.
path
The deprecated name for the mount point. Please use name now.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • parsed: Required binaries: mount, umount. Supported features: refreshable.
remounts
Whether the mount can be remounted mount -o remount. If this is false, then the filesystem will be unmounted and remounted manually, which is prone to failure. Valid values are true, false.
target
The file in which to store the mount table. Only used by those providers that write to disk.

nagios_command

The Nagios type command. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_command.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

command_line
Nagios configuration file parameter.
command_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type command

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_contact

The Nagios type contact. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_contact.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

address1
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address2
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address3
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address4
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address5
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address6
Nagios configuration file parameter.
alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
can_submit_commands
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contact_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type contact

contactgroups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
email
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
host_notification_commands
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_notification_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_notification_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_notifications_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
pager
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_nonstatus_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_status_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_notification_commands
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_notification_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_notification_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_notifications_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_contactgroup

The Nagios type contactgroup. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_contactgroup.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contactgroup_members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contactgroup_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type contactgroup

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_host

The Nagios type host. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_host.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

action_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
active_checks_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
address
Nagios configuration file parameter.
alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_command
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_freshness
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contact_groups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contacts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
display_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
event_handler
Nagios configuration file parameter.
event_handler_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
failure_prediction_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
first_notification_delay
Nagios configuration file parameter.
flap_detection_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
flap_detection_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
freshness_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
high_flap_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type host

hostgroups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image_alt
Nagios configuration file parameter.
initial_state
Nagios configuration file parameter.
low_flap_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
max_check_attempts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notifications_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
obsess_over_host
Nagios configuration file parameter.
parents
Nagios configuration file parameter.
passive_checks_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
process_perf_data
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_nonstatus_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_status_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retry_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
stalking_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
statusmap_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.
vrml_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_hostdependency

The Nagios type hostdependency. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_hostdependency.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type hostdependency

dependency_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
dependent_host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
dependent_hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
execution_failure_criteria
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
inherits_parent
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_failure_criteria
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_hostescalation

The Nagios type hostescalation. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_hostescalation.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type hostescalation

contact_groups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contacts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
escalation_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
escalation_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
first_notification
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
last_notification
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_hostextinfo

The Nagios type hostextinfo. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_hostextinfo.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
host_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type hostextinfo

icon_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image_alt
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
statusmap_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.
vrml_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_hostgroup

The Nagios type hostgroup. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_hostgroup.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

action_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
hostgroup_members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type hostgroup

members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_service

The Nagios type service. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_service.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type service

action_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
active_checks_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_command
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_freshness
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
check_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contact_groups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contacts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
display_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
event_handler
Nagios configuration file parameter.
event_handler_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
failure_prediction_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
first_notification_delay
Nagios configuration file parameter.
flap_detection_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
flap_detection_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
freshness_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
high_flap_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image_alt
Nagios configuration file parameter.
initial_state
Nagios configuration file parameter.
is_volatile
Nagios configuration file parameter.
low_flap_threshold
Nagios configuration file parameter.
max_check_attempts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
normal_check_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notifications_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
obsess_over_service
Nagios configuration file parameter.
parallelize_check
Nagios configuration file parameter.
passive_checks_enabled
Nagios configuration file parameter.
process_perf_data
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_nonstatus_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retain_status_information
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retry_check_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
retry_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_description
Nagios configuration file parameter.
servicegroups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
stalking_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_servicedependency

The Nagios type servicedependency. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_servicedependency.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type servicedependency

dependency_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
dependent_host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
dependent_hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
dependent_service_description
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
execution_failure_criteria
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
inherits_parent
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_failure_criteria
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_description
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_serviceescalation

The Nagios type serviceescalation. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_serviceescalation.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type serviceescalation

contact_groups
Nagios configuration file parameter.
contacts
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
escalation_options
Nagios configuration file parameter.
escalation_period
Nagios configuration file parameter.
first_notification
Nagios configuration file parameter.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
hostgroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
last_notification
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notification_interval
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_description
Nagios configuration file parameter.
servicegroup_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_serviceextinfo

The Nagios type serviceextinfo. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_serviceextinfo.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

_naginator_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type serviceextinfo

action_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
host_name
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image
Nagios configuration file parameter.
icon_image_alt
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
service_description
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_servicegroup

The Nagios type servicegroup. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_servicegroup.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

action_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes
Nagios configuration file parameter.
notes_url
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
servicegroup_members
Nagios configuration file parameter.
servicegroup_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type servicegroup

target
target
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.

nagios_timeperiod

The Nagios type timeperiod. This resource type is autogenerated using the model developed in Naginator, and all of the Nagios types are generated using the same code and the same library.

This type generates Nagios configuration statements in Nagios-parseable configuration files. By default, the statements will be added to /etc/nagios/nagios_timeperiod.cfg, but you can send them to a different file by setting their target attribute.

You can purge Nagios resources using the resources type, but only in the default file locations. This is an architectural limitation.

Parameters

alias
Nagios configuration file parameter.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
exclude
Nagios configuration file parameter.
friday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
monday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • naginator:
register
Nagios configuration file parameter.
saturday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
sunday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
target
target
thursday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
timeperiod_name
  • namevar

    The name parameter for Nagios type timeperiod

tuesday
Nagios configuration file parameter.
use
Nagios configuration file parameter.
wednesday
Nagios configuration file parameter.

notify

Sends an arbitrary message to the agent run-time log.

Parameters

message
The message to be sent to the log.
name
An arbitrary tag for your own reference; the name of the message.
withpath
Whether to not to show the full object path. Valid values are true, false.

package

Manage packages. There is a basic dichotomy in package support right now: Some package types (e.g., yum and apt) can retrieve their own package files, while others (e.g., rpm and sun) cannot. For those package formats that cannot retrieve their own files, you can use the source parameter to point to the correct file.

Puppet will automatically guess the packaging format that you are using based on the platform you are on, but you can override it using the provider parameter; each provider defines what it requires in order to function, and you must meet those requirements to use a given provider.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the files specified as a package’s adminfile, responsefile, or source, the package resource will autorequire those files.

Features

  • holdable: The provider is capable of placing packages on hold such that they are not automatically upgraded as a result of other package dependencies unless explicit action is taken by a user or another package. Held is considered a superset of installed.
  • installable: The provider can install packages.
  • purgeable: The provider can purge packages. This generally means that all traces of the package are removed, including existing configuration files. This feature is thus destructive and should be used with the utmost care.
  • uninstallable: The provider can uninstall packages.
  • upgradeable: The provider can upgrade to the latest version of a package. This feature is used by specifying latest as the desired value for the package.
  • versionable: The provider is capable of interrogating the package database for installed version(s), and can select which out of a set of available versions of a package to install if asked.
Provider holdable installable purgeable uninstallable upgradeable versionable
aix   X   X X X
appdmg   X        
apple   X        
apt X X X X X X
aptitude X X X X X X
aptrpm   X X X X X
blastwave   X   X X  
dpkg X X X X X  
fink X X X X X X
freebsd   X   X    
gem   X   X X X
hpux   X   X    
macports   X   X X X
nim   X   X X X
openbsd   X   X   X
pip   X   X X X
pkg   X   X X  
pkgdmg   X        
pkgutil   X   X X  
portage   X   X X X
ports   X   X X  
portupgrade   X   X X  
rpm   X   X X X
rug   X   X X X
sun   X   X X  
sunfreeware   X   X X  
up2date   X   X X  
urpmi   X   X X X
yum   X X X X X
zypper   X   X X X

Parameters

adminfile
A file containing package defaults for installing packages. This is currently only used on Solaris. The value will be validated according to system rules, which in the case of Solaris means that it should either be a fully qualified path or it should be in /var/sadm/install/admin.
allowcdrom
Tells apt to allow cdrom sources in the sources.list file. Normally apt will bail if you try this. Valid values are true, false.
category
A read-only parameter set by the package.
configfiles
Whether configfiles should be kept or replaced. Most packages types do not support this parameter. Valid values are keep, replace.
description
A read-only parameter set by the package.
ensure
What state the package should be in. latest only makes sense for those packaging formats that can retrieve new packages on their own and will throw an error on those that cannot. For those packaging systems that allow you to specify package versions, specify them here. Similarly, purged is only useful for packaging systems that support the notion of managing configuration files separately from ‘normal’ system files. Valid values are present (also called installed), absent, purged, held, latest. Values can match /./.
flavor
Newer versions of OpenBSD support ‘flavors’, which are further specifications for which type of package you want.
instance
A read-only parameter set by the package.
name
The package name. This is the name that the packaging system uses internally, which is sometimes (especially on Solaris) a name that is basically useless to humans. If you want to abstract package installation, then you can use aliases to provide a common name to packages:
  # In the 'openssl' class
  $ssl = $operatingsystem ? {
    solaris => SMCossl,
    default => openssl
  }

  # It is not an error to set an alias to the same value as the
  # object name.
  package { $ssl:
    ensure => installed,
    alias => openssl
  }

  . etc. .

  $ssh = $operatingsystem ? {
    solaris => SMCossh,
    default => openssh
  }

  # Use the alias to specify a dependency, rather than
  # having another selector to figure it out again.
  package { $ssh:
    ensure => installed,
    alias => openssh,
    require => Package[openssl]
  }
platform
A read-only parameter set by the package.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • aix: Installation from AIX Software directory Required binaries: /usr/bin/lslpp, /usr/sbin/installp. Default for operatingsystem == aix. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • appdmg: Package management which copies application bundles to a target. Required binaries: /usr/bin/hdiutil, /usr/bin/curl, /usr/bin/ditto. Supported features: installable.
  • apple: Package management based on OS X’s builtin packaging system. This is essentially the simplest and least functional package system in existence – it only supports installation; no deletion or upgrades. The provider will automatically add the .pkg extension, so leave that off when specifying the package name. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/installer. Supported features: installable.
  • apt: Package management via apt-get. Required binaries: /usr/bin/apt-cache, /usr/bin/debconf-set-selections, /usr/bin/apt-get. Default for operatingsystem == debianubuntu. Supported features: holdable, installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • aptitude: Package management via aptitude. Required binaries: /usr/bin/apt-cache, /usr/bin/aptitude. Supported features: holdable, installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • aptrpm: Package management via apt-get ported to rpm. Required binaries: apt-cache, rpm, apt-get. Supported features: installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • blastwave: Package management using Blastwave.org’s pkg-get command on Solaris. Required binaries: pkg-get. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • dpkg: Package management via dpkg. Because this only uses dpkg and not apt, you must specify the source of any packages you want to manage. Required binaries: /usr/bin/dpkg-deb, /usr/bin/dpkg-query, /usr/bin/dpkg. Supported features: holdable, installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • fink: Package management via fink. Required binaries: /sw/bin/apt-cache, /sw/bin/dpkg-query, /sw/bin/fink, /sw/bin/apt-get. Supported features: holdable, installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • freebsd: The specific form of package management on FreeBSD. This is an extremely quirky packaging system, in that it freely mixes between ports and packages. Apparently all of the tools are written in Ruby, so there are plans to rewrite this support to directly use those libraries. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/pkg_add, /usr/sbin/pkg_info, /usr/sbin/pkg_delete. Supported features: installable, uninstallable.
  • gem: Ruby Gem support. If a URL is passed via source, then that URL is used as the remote gem repository; if a source is present but is not a valid URL, it will be interpreted as the path to a local gem file. If source is not present at all, the gem will be installed from the default gem repositories. Required binaries: gem. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • hpux: HP-UX’s packaging system. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/swinstall, /usr/sbin/swlist, /usr/sbin/swremove. Default for operatingsystem == hp-ux. Supported features: installable, uninstallable.
  • macports: Package management using MacPorts on OS X.

    Supports MacPorts versions and revisions, but not variants. Variant preferences may be specified using the MacPorts variants.conf file http://guide.macports.org/chunked/internals.configuration-files.html#internals.configuration-files.variants-conf

    When specifying a version in the Puppet DSL, only specify the version, not the revision Revisions are only used internally for ensuring the latest version/revision of a port. Required binaries: /opt/local/bin/port. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.

  • nim: Installation from NIM LPP source Required binaries: /usr/sbin/nimclient. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • openbsd: OpenBSD’s form of pkg_add support. Required binaries: pkg_add, pkg_info, pkg_delete. Default for operatingsystem == openbsd. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, versionable.
  • pip: Python packages via pip. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • pkg: OpenSolaris image packaging system. See pkg(5) for more information Required binaries: /usr/bin/pkg. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • pkgdmg: Package management based on Apple’s Installer.app and DiskUtility.app. This package works by checking the contents of a DMG image for Apple pkg or mpkg files. Any number of pkg or mpkg files may exist in the root directory of the DMG file system. Sub directories are not checked for packages. See the wiki docs <http://projects.puppetlabs.com/projects/puppet/wiki/Package_Management_With_Dmg_Patterns> for more detail. Required binaries: /usr/bin/hdiutil, /usr/bin/curl, /usr/sbin/installer. Default for operatingsystem == darwin. Supported features: installable.
  • pkgutil: Package management using Peter Bonivart’s pkgutil command on Solaris. Required binaries: pkgutil. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • portage: Provides packaging support for Gentoo’s portage system. Required binaries: /usr/bin/eix-update, /usr/bin/emerge, /usr/bin/eix. Default for operatingsystem == gentoo. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • ports: Support for FreeBSD’s ports. Again, this still mixes packages and ports. Required binaries: /usr/local/sbin/portversion, /usr/local/sbin/pkg_deinstall, /usr/sbin/pkg_info, /usr/local/sbin/portupgrade. Default for operatingsystem == freebsd. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • portupgrade: Support for FreeBSD’s ports using the portupgrade ports management software. Use the port’s full origin as the resource name. eg (ports-mgmt/portupgrade) for the portupgrade port. Required binaries: /usr/local/sbin/portversion, /usr/local/sbin/pkg_deinstall, /usr/local/sbin/portinstall, /usr/sbin/pkg_info, /usr/local/sbin/portupgrade. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • rpm: RPM packaging support; should work anywhere with a working rpm binary. Required binaries: rpm. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • rug: Support for suse rug package manager. Required binaries: /usr/bin/rug, rpm. Default for operatingsystem == susesles. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • sun: Sun’s packaging system. Requires that you specify the source for the packages you’re managing. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/pkgadd, /usr/sbin/pkgrm, /usr/bin/pkginfo. Default for operatingsystem == solaris. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • sunfreeware: Package management using sunfreeware.com’s pkg-get command on Solaris. At this point, support is exactly the same as blastwave support and has not actually been tested. Required binaries: pkg-get. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • up2date: Support for Red Hat’s proprietary up2date package update mechanism. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/up2date-nox. Default for operatingsystem == redhatoelovm and lsbdistrelease == 2.134. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable.
  • urpmi: Support via urpmi. Required binaries: rpm, urpmi, urpmq. Default for operatingsystem == mandrivamandrake. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • yum: Support via yum. Required binaries: yum, python, rpm. Default for operatingsystem == fedoracentosredhat. Supported features: installable, purgeable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
  • zypper: Support for SuSE zypper package manager. Found in SLES10sp2+ and SLES11 Required binaries: /usr/bin/zypper, rpm. Supported features: installable, uninstallable, upgradeable, versionable.
responsefile
A file containing any necessary answers to questions asked by the package. This is currently used on Solaris and Debian. The value will be validated according to system rules, but it should generally be a fully qualified path.
root
A read-only parameter set by the package.
source
Where to find the actual package. This must be a local file (or on a network file system) or a URL that your specific packaging type understands; Puppet will not retrieve files for you.
status
A read-only parameter set by the package.
type
Deprecated form of provider.
vendor
A read-only parameter set by the package.

resources

This is a metatype that can manage other resource types. Any metaparams specified here will be passed on to any generated resources, so you can purge umanaged resources but set noop to true so the purging is only logged and does not actually happen.

Parameters

name
The name of the type to be managed.
purge
Purge unmanaged resources. This will delete any resource that is not specified in your configuration and is not required by any specified resources. Valid values are true, false.
unless_system_user
This keeps system users from being purged. By default, it does not purge users whose UIDs are less than or equal to 500, but you can specify a different UID as the inclusive limit. Valid values are true, false. Values can match /^\d+$/.

router

Manages connected router.

Parameters

url
  • namevar

    An URL to access the router of the form (ssh telnet)://user:pass:enable@host/.

schedule

Defined schedules for Puppet. The important thing to understand about how schedules are currently implemented in Puppet is that they can only be used to stop a resource from being applied, they never guarantee that it is applied.

Every time Puppet applies its configuration, it will collect the list of resources whose schedule does not eliminate them from running right then, but there is currently no system in place to guarantee that a given resource runs at a given time. If you specify a very restrictive schedule and Puppet happens to run at a time within that schedule, then the resources will get applied; otherwise, that work may never get done.

Thus, it behooves you to use wider scheduling (e.g., over a couple of hours) combined with periods and repetitions. For instance, if you wanted to restrict certain resources to only running once, between the hours of two and 4 AM, then you would use this schedule:

schedule { maint:
  range => "2 - 4",
  period => daily,
  repeat => 1
}

With this schedule, the first time that Puppet runs between 2 and 4 AM, all resources with this schedule will get applied, but they won’t get applied again between 2 and 4 because they will have already run once that day, and they won’t get applied outside that schedule because they will be outside the scheduled range.

Puppet automatically creates a schedule for each valid period with the same name as that period (e.g., hourly and daily). Additionally, a schedule named puppet is created and used as the default, with the following attributes:

schedule { puppet:
  period => hourly,
  repeat => 2
}

This will cause resources to be applied every 30 minutes by default.

Parameters

name
The name of the schedule. This name is used to retrieve the schedule when assigning it to an object:
  schedule { daily:
    period => daily,
    range => "2 - 4",
  }
  
  exec { "/usr/bin/apt-get update":
    schedule => daily
  }
period
The period of repetition for a resource. Choose from among a fixed list of hourly, daily, weekly, and monthly. The default is for a resource to get applied every time that Puppet runs, whatever that period is.

Note that the period defines how often a given resource will get applied but not when; if you would like to restrict the hours that a given resource can be applied (e.g., only at night during a maintenance window) then use the range attribute.

If the provided periods are not sufficient, you can provide a value to the repeat attribute, which will cause Puppet to schedule the affected resources evenly in the period the specified number of times. Take this schedule:

  schedule { veryoften:
    period => hourly,
    repeat => 6
  }

This can cause Puppet to apply that resource up to every 10 minutes.

At the moment, Puppet cannot guarantee that level of repetition; that is, it can run up to every 10 minutes, but internal factors might prevent it from actually running that often (e.g., long-running Puppet runs will squash conflictingly scheduled runs).

See the periodmatch attribute for tuning whether to match times by their distance apart or by their specific value. Valid values are hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, never.

periodmatch
Whether periods should be matched by number (e.g., the two times are in the same hour) or by distance (e.g., the two times are 60 minutes apart). Valid values are number, distance.
range
The earliest and latest that a resource can be applied. This is always a range within a 24 hour period, and hours must be specified in numbers between 0 and 23, inclusive. Minutes and seconds can be provided, using the normal colon as a separator. For instance:
  schedule { maintenance:
    range => "1:30 - 4:30"
  }

This is mostly useful for restricting certain resources to being applied in maintenance windows or during off-peak hours.

repeat
How often the application gets repeated in a given period. Defaults to 1. Must be an integer.

selboolean

Manages SELinux booleans on systems with SELinux support. The supported booleans are any of the ones found in /selinux/booleans/.

Parameters

name
The name of the SELinux boolean to be managed.
persistent
If set true, SELinux booleans will be written to disk and persist accross reboots. The default is false. Valid values are true, false.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • getsetsebool: Manage SELinux booleans using the getsebool and setsebool binaries. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/getsebool, /usr/sbin/setsebool.
value
Whether the the SELinux boolean should be enabled or disabled. Valid values are on, off.

selmodule

Manages loading and unloading of SELinux policy modules on the system. Requires SELinux support. See man semodule(8) for more information on SELinux policy modules.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the file containing this SELinux policy module (which is either explicitly specified in the selmodulepath attribute or will be found at {selmoduledir}/{name}.pp), the selmodule resource will autorequire that file.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
name
The name of the SELinux policy to be managed. You should not include the customary trailing .pp extension.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • semodule: Manage SELinux policy modules using the semodule binary. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/semodule.
selmoduledir
The directory to look for the compiled pp module file in. Currently defaults to /usr/share/selinux/targeted. If selmodulepath is not specified the module will be looked for in this directory in a in a file called NAME.pp, where NAME is the value of the name parameter.
selmodulepath
The full path to the compiled .pp policy module. You only need to use this if the module file is not in the directory pointed at by selmoduledir.
syncversion
If set to true, the policy will be reloaded if the version found in the on-disk file differs from the loaded version. If set to false (the default) the the only check that will be made is if the policy is loaded at all or not. Valid values are true, false.

service

Manage running services. Service support unfortunately varies widely by platform — some platforms have very little if any concept of a running service, and some have a very codified and powerful concept. Puppet’s service support is usually capable of doing the right thing, but the more information you can provide, the better behaviour you will get.

Puppet 2.7 and newer expect init scripts to have a working status command. If this isn’t the case for any of your services’ init scripts, you will need to set hasstatus to false and possibly specify a custom status command in the status attribute.

Note that if a service receives an event from another resource, the service will get restarted. The actual command to restart the service depends on the platform. You can provide an explicit command for restarting with the restart attribute, or use the init script’s restart command with the hasrestart attribute; if you do neither, the service’s stop and start commands will be used.

Features

  • controllable: The provider uses a control variable.
  • enableable: The provider can enable and disable the service
  • refreshable: The provider can restart the service.
Provider controllable enableable refreshable
base     X
bsd   X X
daemontools   X X
debian   X X
freebsd   X X
gentoo   X X
init     X
launchd   X X
redhat   X X
runit   X X
smf   X X
src     X
upstart     X

Parameters

binary
The path to the daemon. This is only used for systems that do not support init scripts. This binary will be used to start the service if no start parameter is provided.
control
The control variable used to manage services (originally for HP-UX). Defaults to the upcased service name plus START replacing dots with underscores, for those providers that support the controllable feature.
enable
Whether a service should be enabled to start at boot. This property behaves quite differently depending on the platform; wherever possible, it relies on local tools to enable or disable a given service. Valid values are true, false. Requires features enableable.
ensure
Whether a service should be running. Valid values are stopped (also called false), running (also called true).
hasrestart
Specify that an init script has a restart option. Otherwise, the init script’s stop and start methods are used. Valid values are true, false.
hasstatus
Declare whether the service’s init script has a functional status command; defaults to true. This attribute’s default value changed in Puppet 2.7.0.

If a service’s init script does not support any kind of status command, you should set hasstatus to false and either provide a specific command using the status attribute or expect that Puppet will look for the service name in the process table. Be aware that ‘virtual’ init scripts (like ‘network’ under Red Hat systems) will respond poorly to refresh events from other resources if you override the default behavior without providing a status command.

manifest
Specify a command to config a service, or a path to a manifest to do so.
name
The name of the service to run. This name is used to find the service in whatever service subsystem it is in.
path
The search path for finding init scripts. Multiple values should be separated by colons or provided as an array.
pattern
The pattern to search for in the process table. This is used for stopping services on platforms that do not support init scripts, and is also used for determining service status on those service whose init scripts do not include a status command.

If this is left unspecified and is needed to check the status of a service, then the service name will be used instead.

The pattern can be a simple string or any legal Ruby pattern.

provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • base: The simplest form of service support.

    You have to specify enough about your service for this to work; the minimum you can specify is a binary for starting the process, and this same binary will be searched for in the process table to stop the service. It is preferable to specify start, stop, and status commands, akin to how you would do so using init.

    Required binaries: kill. Supported features: refreshable.

  • bsd: FreeBSD’s (and probably NetBSD?) form of init-style service management.

    Uses rc.conf.d for service enabling and disabling.

    Supported features: `enableable`, `refreshable`.
    
  • daemontools: Daemontools service management.

    This provider manages daemons running supervised by D.J.Bernstein daemontools. It tries to detect the service directory, with by order of preference:

    • /service
    • /etc/service
    • /var/lib/svscan

    The daemon directory should be placed in a directory that can be by default in:

    • /var/lib/service
    • /etc

    or this can be overriden in the service resource parameters::

    service { "myservice":   provider => "daemontools",   path => "/path/to/daemons",
    }
    

    This provider supports out of the box:

    • start/stop (mapped to enable/disable)
    • enable/disable
    • restart
    • status

    If a service has ensure => "running", it will link /path/to/daemon to /path/to/service, which will automatically enable the service.

    If a service has ensure => "stopped", it will only down the service, not remove the /path/to/service link.

    Required binaries: /usr/bin/svc, /usr/bin/svstat. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • debian: Debian’s form of init-style management.

    The only difference is that this supports service enabling and disabling via update-rc.d and determines enabled status via invoke-rc.d.

    Required binaries: /usr/sbin/update-rc.d, /usr/sbin/invoke-rc.d. Default for operatingsystem == debianubuntu. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • freebsd: Provider for FreeBSD. Makes use of rcvar argument of init scripts and parses/edits rc files. Default for operatingsystem == freebsd. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.
  • gentoo: Gentoo’s form of init-style service management.

    Uses rc-update for service enabling and disabling.

    Required binaries: /sbin/rc-update. Default for operatingsystem == gentoo. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • init: Standard init service management.

    This provider assumes that the init script has no status command, because so few scripts do, so you need to either provide a status command or specify via hasstatus that one already exists in the init script.

    Supported features: `refreshable`.
    
  • launchd: launchd service management framework.

    This provider manages jobs with launchd, which is the default service framework for Mac OS X and is potentially available for use on other platforms.

    See:

    • http://developer.apple.com/macosx/launchd.html
    • http://launchd.macosforge.org/

    This provider reads plists out of the following directories:

    • /System/Library/LaunchDaemons
    • /System/Library/LaunchAgents
    • /Library/LaunchDaemons
    • /Library/LaunchAgents

    …and builds up a list of services based upon each plist’s “Label” entry.

    This provider supports:

    • ensure => running/stopped,
    • enable => true/false
    • status
    • restart

    Here is how the Puppet states correspond to launchd states:

    • stopped — job unloaded
    • started — job loaded
    • enabled — ‘Disable’ removed from job plist file
    • disabled — ‘Disable’ added to job plist file

    Note that this allows you to do something launchctl can’t do, which is to be in a state of “stopped/enabled or “running/disabled”.

    Required binaries: /bin/launchctl, /usr/bin/plutil, /usr/bin/sw_vers. Default for operatingsystem == darwin. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • redhat: Red Hat’s (and probably many others) form of init-style service management:

    Uses chkconfig for service enabling and disabling.

    Required binaries: /sbin/service, /sbin/chkconfig. Default for operatingsystem == redhatfedorasusecentosslesoelovm. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • runit: Runit service management.

    This provider manages daemons running supervised by Runit. It tries to detect the service directory, with by order of preference:

    • /service
    • /var/service
    • /etc/service

    The daemon directory should be placed in a directory that can be by default in:

    • /etc/sv

    or this can be overriden in the service resource parameters::

    service { "myservice":   provider => "runit",   path => "/path/to/daemons",
    }
    

    This provider supports out of the box:

    • start/stop
    • enable/disable
    • restart
    • status

    Required binaries: /usr/bin/sv. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • smf: Support for Sun’s new Service Management Framework.

    Starting a service is effectively equivalent to enabling it, so there is only support for starting and stopping services, which also enables and disables them, respectively.

    By specifying manifest => “/path/to/service.xml”, the SMF manifest will be imported if it does not exist.

    Required binaries: /usr/sbin/svcadm, /usr/bin/svcs, /usr/sbin/svccfg. Default for operatingsystem == solaris. Supported features: enableable, refreshable.

  • src: Support for AIX’s System Resource controller.

    Services are started/stopped based on the stopsrc and startsrc commands, and some services can be refreshed with refresh command.

    • Enabling and disableing services is not supported, as it requires modifications to /etc/inittab.

    • Starting and stopping groups of subsystems is not yet supported Required binaries: /usr/bin/stopsrc, /usr/bin/startsrc, /usr/bin/lssrc, /usr/bin/refresh. Default for operatingsystem == aix. Supported features: refreshable.

  • upstart: Ubuntu service manager upstart.

    This provider manages upstart jobs which have replaced initd.

    See: * http://upstart.ubuntu.com/ Required binaries: /sbin/restart, /sbin/start, /sbin/status, /sbin/initctl, /sbin/stop. Supported features: refreshable.

restart
Specify a restart command manually. If left unspecified, the service will be stopped and then started.
start
Specify a start command manually. Most service subsystems support a start command, so this will not need to be specified.
status
Specify a status command manually. This command must return 0 if the service is running and a nonzero value otherwise. Ideally, these return codes should conform to the LSB’s specification for init script status actions, but puppet only considers the difference between 0 and nonzero to be relevant.

If left unspecified, the status method will be determined automatically, usually by looking for the service in the process table.

stop
Specify a stop command manually.

ssh_authorized_key

Manages SSH authorized keys. Currently only type 2 keys are supported.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the user account in which this SSH key should be installed, the ssh_authorized_key resource will autorequire that user.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
key
The key itself; generally a long string of hex digits.
name
The SSH key comment. This attribute is currently used as a system-wide primary key and therefore has to be unique.
options
Key options, see sshd(8) for possible values. Multiple values should be specified as an array.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • parsed: Parse and generate authorized_keys files for SSH.
target
The absolute filename in which to store the SSH key. This property is optional and should only be used in cases where keys are stored in a non-standard location (i.e. not in ~user/.ssh/authorized_keys`).
type
The encryption type used: ssh-dss or ssh-rsa. Valid values are ssh-dss (also called dsa), ssh-rsa (also called rsa).
user
The user account in which the SSH key should be installed. The resource will automatically depend on this user.

sshkey

Installs and manages ssh host keys. At this point, this type only knows how to install keys into /etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts. See the ssh_authorized_key type to manage authorized keys.

Parameters

ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
host_aliases
Any aliases the host might have. Multiple values must be specified as an array.
key
The key itself; generally a long string of hex digits.
name
The host name that the key is associated with.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • parsed: Parse and generate host-wide known hosts files for SSH.
target
The file in which to store the ssh key. Only used by the parsed provider.
type
The encryption type used. Probably ssh-dss or ssh-rsa. Valid values are ssh-dss (also called dsa), ssh-rsa (also called rsa).

stage

A resource type for specifying run stages. The actual stage should be specified on resources:

class { foo: stage => pre }

And you must manually control stage order:

stage { pre: before => Stage[main] }

You automatically get a ‘main’ stage created, and by default all resources get inserted into that stage.

You can only set stages on class resources, not normal builtin resources.

Parameters

name
The name of the stage. This will be used as the ‘stage’ for each resource.

tidy

Remove unwanted files based on specific criteria. Multiple criteria are OR’d together, so a file that is too large but is not old enough will still get tidied.

If you don’t specify either age or size, then all files will be removed.

This resource type works by generating a file resource for every file that should be deleted and then letting that resource perform the actual deletion.

Parameters

age
Tidy files whose age is equal to or greater than the specified time. You can choose seconds, minutes, hours, days, or weeks by specifying the first letter of any of those words (e.g., ‘1w’).

Specifying 0 will remove all files.

backup
Whether tidied files should be backed up. Any values are passed directly to the file resources used for actual file deletion, so use its backup documentation to determine valid values.
matches
One or more (shell type) file glob patterns, which restrict the list of files to be tidied to those whose basenames match at least one of the patterns specified. Multiple patterns can be specified using an array.

Example:

  tidy { "/tmp":
    age => "1w",
    recurse => 1,
    matches => [ "[0-9]pub*.tmp", "*.temp", "tmpfile?" ]
  }

This removes files from /tmp if they are one week old or older, are not in a subdirectory and match one of the shell globs given.

Note that the patterns are matched against the basename of each file – that is, your glob patterns should not have any ‘/’ characters in them, since you are only specifying against the last bit of the file.

Finally, note that you must now specify a non-zero/non-false value for recurse if matches is used, as matches only apply to files found by recursion (there’s no reason to use static patterns match against a statically determined path). Requiering explicit recursion clears up a common source of confusion.

path
  • namevar

    The path to the file or directory to manage. Must be fully qualified.

recurse
If target is a directory, recursively descend into the directory looking for files to tidy. Valid values are true, false, inf. Values can match /^[0-9]+$/.
rmdirs
Tidy directories in addition to files; that is, remove directories whose age is older than the specified criteria. This will only remove empty directories, so all contained files must also be tidied before a directory gets removed. Valid values are true, false.
size
Tidy files whose size is equal to or greater than the specified size. Unqualified values are in kilobytes, but b, k, m, g, and t can be appended to specify bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes, and terabytes, respectively. Only the first character is significant, so the full word can also be used.
type
Set the mechanism for determining age. Valid values are atime, mtime, ctime.

user

Manage users. This type is mostly built to manage system users, so it is lacking some features useful for managing normal users.

This resource type uses the prescribed native tools for creating groups and generally uses POSIX APIs for retrieving information about them. It does not directly modify /etc/passwd or anything.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the user’s primary group (as provided in the gid attribute), the user resource will autorequire that group. If Puppet is managing any role accounts corresponding to the user’s roles, the user resource will autorequire those role accounts.

Features

  • allows_duplicates: The provider supports duplicate users with the same UID.
  • manages_aix_lam: The provider can manage AIX Loadable Authentication Module (LAM) system.
  • manages_expiry: The provider can manage the expiry date for a user.
  • manages_homedir: The provider can create and remove home directories.
  • manages_password_age: The provider can set age requirements and restrictions for passwords.
  • manages_passwords: The provider can modify user passwords, by accepting a password hash.
  • manages_solaris_rbac: The provider can manage roles and normal users
  • system_users: The provider allows you to create system users with lower UIDs.
Provider allows_duplicates manages_aix_lam manages_expiry manages_homedir manages_password_age manages_passwords manages_solaris_rbac system_users
aix   X X X X X    
directoryservice           X    
hpuxuseradd X     X        
ldap           X    
pw X     X        
user_role_add X     X X X X  
useradd X   X X X X   X

Parameters

allowdupe
Whether to allow duplicate UIDs. Valid values are true, false.
attribute_membership
Whether specified attribute value pairs should be treated as the only attributes of the user or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
attributes
Specify user AIX attributes in an array of keyvalue pairs Requires features manages_aix_lam.
auth_membership
Whether specified auths should be treated as the only auths of which the user is a member or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum membership list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
auths
The auths the user has. Multiple auths should be specified as an array. Requires features manages_solaris_rbac.
comment
A description of the user. Generally is a user’s full name.
ensure
The basic state that the object should be in. Valid values are present, absent, role.
expiry
The expiry date for this user. Must be provided in a zero padded YYYY-MM-DD format - e.g 2010-02-19. Requires features manages_expiry.
gid
The user’s primary group. Can be specified numerically or by name.
groups
The groups of which the user is a member. The primary group should not be listed. Multiple groups should be specified as an array.
home
The home directory of the user. The directory must be created separately and is not currently checked for existence.
ia_load_module
The name of the I&A module to use to manage this user Requires features manages_aix_lam.
key_membership
Whether specified key value pairs should be treated as the only attributes of the user or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
keys
Specify user attributes in an array of keyvalue pairs Requires features manages_solaris_rbac.
managehome
Whether to manage the home directory when managing the user. Valid values are true, false.
membership
Whether specified groups should be treated as the only groups of which the user is a member or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum membership list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
name
User name. While limitations are determined for each operating system, it is generally a good idea to keep to the degenerate 8 characters, beginning with a letter.
password
The user’s password, in whatever encrypted format the local machine requires. Be sure to enclose any value that includes a dollar sign ($) in single quotes (‘). Requires features manages_passwords.
password_max_age
The maximum amount of time in days a password may be used before it must be changed Requires features manages_password_age.
password_min_age
The minimum amount of time in days a password must be used before it may be changed Requires features manages_password_age.
profile_membership
Whether specified roles should be treated as the only roles of which the user is a member or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum membership list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
profiles
The profiles the user has. Multiple profiles should be specified as an array. Requires features manages_solaris_rbac.
project
The name of the project associated with a user Requires features manages_solaris_rbac.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • aix: User management for AIX! Users are managed with mkuser, rmuser, chuser, lsuser Required binaries: /usr/sbin/lsgroup, /bin/chpasswd, /usr/sbin/lsuser, /usr/sbin/rmuser, /usr/bin/chuser, /usr/bin/mkuser. Default for operatingsystem == aix. Supported features: manages_aix_lam, manages_expiry, manages_homedir, manages_password_age, manages_passwords.
  • directoryservice: User management using DirectoryService on OS X. Required binaries: /usr/bin/dscl. Default for operatingsystem == darwin. Supported features: manages_passwords.
  • hpuxuseradd: User management for hp-ux! Undocumented switch to special usermod because HP-UX regular usermod is TOO STUPID to change stuff while the user is logged in. Required binaries: /usr/sam/lbin/userdel.sam, /usr/sam/lbin/usermod.sam, /usr/sbin/useradd. Default for operatingsystem == hp-ux. Supported features: allows_duplicates, manages_homedir.
  • ldap: User management via ldap. This provider requires that you have valid values for all of the ldap-related settings, including ldapbase. You will also almost definitely need settings for ldapuser and ldappassword, so that your clients can write to ldap.

    Note that this provider will automatically generate a UID for you if you do not specify one, but it is a potentially expensive operation, as it iterates across all existing users to pick the appropriate next one. Supported features: manages_passwords.

  • pw: User management via pw on FreeBSD. Required binaries: pw. Default for operatingsystem == freebsd. Supported features: allows_duplicates, manages_homedir.
  • user_role_add: User management inherits useradd and adds logic to manage roles on Solaris using roleadd. Required binaries: roleadd, roledel, userdel, passwd, rolemod, usermod, useradd. Default for operatingsystem == solaris. Supported features: allows_duplicates, manages_homedir, manages_password_age, manages_passwords, manages_solaris_rbac.
  • useradd: User management via useradd and its ilk. Note that you will need to install the Shadow Password Ruby library often known as ruby-libshadow to manage user passwords. Required binaries: userdel, chage, usermod, useradd. Supported features: allows_duplicates, manages_expiry, manages_homedir, manages_password_age, manages_passwords, system_users.
role_membership
Whether specified roles should be treated as the only roles of which the user is a member or whether they should merely be treated as the minimum membership list. Valid values are inclusive, minimum.
roles
The roles the user has. Multiple roles should be specified as an array. Requires features manages_solaris_rbac.
shell
The user’s login shell. The shell must exist and be executable.
system
Whether the user is a system user with lower UID. Valid values are true, false.
uid
The user ID. Must be specified numerically. For new users being created, if no user ID is specified then one will be chosen automatically, which will likely result in the same user having different IDs on different systems, which is not recommended. This is especially noteworthy if you use Puppet to manage the same user on both Darwin and other platforms, since Puppet does the ID generation for you on Darwin, but the tools do so on other platforms.

vlan

This represents a router or switch vlan.

Parameters

description
Vlan name
device_url
Url to connect to a router or switch.
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
name
Vlan id. It must be a number Values can match /^\d+/.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • cisco: Cisco switch/router provider for vlans.

yumrepo

The client-side description of a yum repository. Repository configurations are found by parsing /etc/yum.conf and the files indicated by the reposdir option in that file (see yum.conf(5) for details)

Most parameters are identical to the ones documented in yum.conf(5)

Continuation lines that yum supports for example for the baseurl are not supported. No attempt is made to access files included with the include directive

Parameters

baseurl
The URL for this repository. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
cost
Cost of this repository. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /\d+/.
descr
A human readable description of the repository. This corresponds to the name parameter in yum.conf(5). Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
enabled
Whether this repository is enabled or disabled. Possible values are ‘0’, and ‘1’. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /(0|1)/.
enablegroups
Determines whether yum will allow the use of package groups for this repository. Possible values are ‘0’, and ‘1’. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /(0|1)/.
exclude
List of shell globs. Matching packages will never be considered in updates or installs for this repo. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
failovermethod
Either ‘roundrobin’ or ‘priority’. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /roundrobin|priority/.
gpgcheck
Whether to check the GPG signature on packages installed from this repository. Possible values are ‘0’, and ‘1’.

Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /(0|1)/.

gpgkey
The URL for the GPG key with which packages from this repository are signed. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
http_caching
Either ‘packages’ or ‘all’ or ‘none’. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /packages|all|none/.
include
A URL from which to include the config. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
includepkgs
List of shell globs. If this is set, only packages matching one of the globs will be considered for update or install. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
keepalive
Either ‘1’ or ‘0’. This tells yum whether or not HTTP/1.1 keepalive should be used with this repository. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /(0|1)/.
metadata_expire
Number of seconds after which the metadata will expire. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /[0-9]+/.
mirrorlist
The URL that holds the list of mirrors for this repository. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
name
The name of the repository. This corresponds to the repositoryid parameter in yum.conf(5).
priority
Priority of this repository from 1-99. Requires that the priorities plugin is installed and enabled. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /[1-9][0-9]?/.
protect
Enable or disable protection for this repository. Requires that the protectbase plugin is installed and enabled. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /(0|1)/.
proxy
URL to the proxy server for this repository. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
proxy_password
Password for this proxy. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
proxy_username
Username for this proxy. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /.*/.
timeout
Number of seconds to wait for a connection before timing out. Set this to ‘absent’ to remove it from the file completely Valid values are absent. Values can match /[0-9]+/.

zfs

Manage zfs. Create destroy and set properties on zfs instances.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the zpool at the root of this zfs instance, the zfs resource will autorequire it. If Puppet is managing any parent zfs instances, the zfs resource will autorequire them.

Parameters

aclinherit
The aclinherit property. Values: discard noallow restricted passthrough passthrough-x
aclmode
The aclmode property. Values: discard groupmask passthrough
atime
The atime property. Values: on off
canmount
The canmount property. Values: on off noauto
checksum
The checksum property. Values: on off fletcher2 fletcher4 sha256
compression
The compression property. Values: on off lzjb gzip gzip-[1-9] zle
copies
The copies property. Values: 1 2 3
devices
The devices property. Values: on off
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
exec
The exec property. Values: on off
logbias
The logbias property. Values: latency throughput
mountpoint
The mountpoint property. Values: legacy none
name
The full name for this filesystem. (including the zpool)
nbmand
The nbmand property. Values: on off
primarycache
The primarycache property. Values: all none metadata
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • solaris: Provider for Solaris zfs. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/zfs. Default for operatingsystem == solaris.
quota
The quota property. Values: none
readonly
The readonly property. Values: on off
recordsize
The recordsize property. Values: 512 to 128k, power of 2
refquota
The refquota property. Values: none
refreservation
The refreservation property. Values: none
reservation
The reservation property. Values: none
secondarycache
The secondarycache property. Values: all none metadata
setuid
The setuid property. Values: on off
shareiscsi
The shareiscsi property. Values: on off type=
sharenfs
The sharenfs property. Values: on off share(1M) options
sharesmb
The sharesmb property. Values: on off sharemgr(1M) options
snapdir
The snapdir property. Values: hidden visible
version
The version property. Values: 1 2 3 4 current
volsize
The volsize property. Values:
vscan
The vscan property. Values: on off
xattr
The xattr property. Values: on off
zoned
The zoned property. Values: on off

zone

Solaris zones.

Autorequires: If Puppet is managing the directory specified as the root of the zone’s filesystem (with the path attribute), the zone resource will autorequire that directory.

Parameters

autoboot
Whether the zone should automatically boot. Valid values are true, false.
clone
Instead of installing the zone, clone it from another zone. If the zone root resides on a zfs file system, a snapshot will be used to create the clone, is it redisides on ufs, a copy of the zone will be used. The zone you clone from must not be running.
create_args
Arguments to the zonecfg create command. This can be used to create branded zones.
dataset
The list of datasets delegated to the non global zone from the global zone. All datasets must be zfs filesystem names which is different than the mountpoint.
ensure
The running state of the zone. The valid states directly reflect the states that zoneadm provides. The states are linear, in that a zone must be configured then installed, and only then can be running. Note also that halt is currently used to stop zones.
id
The numerical ID of the zone. This number is autogenerated and cannot be changed.
inherit
The list of directories that the zone inherits from the global zone. All directories must be fully qualified.
install_args
Arguments to the zoneadm install command. This can be used to create branded zones.
ip
The IP address of the zone. IP addresses must be specified with the interface, separated by a colon, e.g.: bge0:192.168.0.1. For multiple interfaces, specify them in an array.
iptype
The IP stack type of the zone. Can either be ‘shared’ or ‘exclusive’. Valid values are shared, exclusive.
name
The name of the zone.
path
The root of the zone’s filesystem. Must be a fully qualified file name. If you include ‘%s’ in the path, then it will be replaced with the zone’s name. At this point, you cannot use Puppet to move a zone.
pool
The resource pool for this zone.
provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • solaris: Provider for Solaris Zones. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/zoneadm, /usr/sbin/zonecfg. Default for operatingsystem == solaris.
realhostname
The actual hostname of the zone.
shares
Number of FSS CPU shares allocated to the zone.
sysidcfg
The text to go into the sysidcfg file when the zone is first booted. The best way is to use a template:
  # $templatedir/sysidcfg
  system_locale=en_US
  timezone=GMT
  terminal=xterms
  security_policy=NONE
  root_password=<%= password %>
  timeserver=localhost
  name_service=DNS {domain_name=<%= domain %> name_server=<%= nameserver %>}
  network_interface=primary {hostname=<%= realhostname %>
    ip_address=<%= ip %>
    netmask=<%= netmask %>
    protocol_ipv6=no
    default_route=<%= defaultroute %>}
  nfs4_domain=dynamic

And then call that:

  zone { myzone:
    ip => "bge0:192.168.0.23",
    sysidcfg => template(sysidcfg),
    path => "/opt/zones/myzone",
    realhostname => "fully.qualified.domain.name"
  }

The sysidcfg only matters on the first booting of the zone, so Puppet only checks for it at that time.


zpool

Manage zpools. Create and delete zpools. The provider WILL NOT SYNC, only report differences.

Supports vdevs with mirrors, raidz, logs and spares.

Parameters

disk
The disk(s) for this pool. Can be an array or space separated string
ensure
The basic property that the resource should be in. Valid values are present, absent.
log
Log disks for this pool. (doesn’t support mirroring yet)
mirror
List of all the devices to mirror for this pool. Each mirror should be a space separated string:
  mirror => ["disk1 disk2", "disk3 disk4"],
pool
  • namevar

    The name for this pool.

provider
The specific backend for provider to use. You will seldom need to specify this — Puppet will usually discover the appropriate provider for your platform. Available providers are:
  • solaris: Provider for Solaris zpool. Required binaries: /usr/sbin/zpool. Default for operatingsystem == solaris.
raid_parity
Determines parity when using raidz property.
raidz
List of all the devices to raid for this pool. Should be an array of space separated strings:
  raidz => ["disk1 disk2", "disk3 disk4"],
spare
Spare disk(s) for this pool.

This page autogenerated on Sat May 21 17:20:22 -0700 2011

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